How Long Does a House Last?

how long does a house last

The lifespan of a house should at least be longer than your average mortgage of 25-30 years, however, some build types last considerably longer than others.

How Long Does a House Last?

So let’s have a look at the most popular options in the market today and see how they compare.   

1 . Brick and Block (Masonry) – Lifespan:  60- 100+ Years

The oldest and most traditional method of building is with the good old brick. The brick has been around since 7000 BC and has been used ever since for the construction of buildings. Brick and block constructions make for a very strong solid structure that will last many decades possibly even centuries if it is well maintained. 

Pros: Bricks are incredibly durable, and a well built and masonry house will last at least twice as long as a timber-frame equivalent. Bricks have a high thermal mass which means that they are very good at storing heat which in theory should help with maintaining an even temperature in your home throughout the day and night.

Cons: Brick and block is a slower building method compared to timber-frame and takes nearly twice as long as timberframe build. Materials for Masonry builds come with a higher cost but this type of build is one of the most durable ways to construct a house. 

According to a recent report, sluggish Government house building means that every house in existence in the UK will have to last for 2,000 years in order to keep up with demand – Check out the article here: https://www.constructionnews.co.uk/buildings/sectors/uk-houses-will-have-to-last-2000-years-says-lga-18-08-2017/

2. Timber Framed House – Lifespan: 25 – 30 Years

These days, your average timber-framed house is made from softwood timber, unlike our Tudor ancestors who built with solid hardwood Oak frames that have stood the test of time. Building with softwood timber is quick and relatively inexpensive compared to the more traditional methods of building like Brick and Block.

Pros: It is usually a much greener way of building compared to other building types as it produces much less CO2. Other positives include cost savings on labour and materials and better energy efficiency when it comes to heating the house because the heat doesn’t retain in the walls as much as a Masonry house.

Cons: Timber is vulnerable to wet and dry rot and from vermin and insect attacks. Termites that originate from Europe can now be found in several counties across the UK which can reap havoc in your timber-frame house. They are white ant-like insects that eat through timber 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Unfortunately, the majority of UK insurance companies do not cover wet/dry rot and any damage caused by vermin/insects. Temperature regulation is poor in a Timber framed house as it will have a low thermal mass. 

3. SIPS  – Lifespan:  60+ Years

A Structural Insulated Panel (SIP) is a piece of thick insulation bonded in-between two sheets of oriented strand board (OSB) and is a construction method that is now used for residential and light commercial construction projects. SIPs are a high-performance system that is extremely strong, energy-efficient and cost-effective. For these reasons building a house with SIPs, is a great investment.

Pros: The cost of building with SIPs is generally the same as building with timber due to reduced labour and material costs. SIPs constructions are very energy efficient with a low U-Value (heat loss indicator) and therefore require smaller heating/cooling systems. The lifespan of a SIPs house will last much longer than a timber-frame equivalent. SIPs panels are a great choice for Passive House projects. A Passive House is 90% more energy-efficient than a traditional house.   

Cons: Moisture problems can occur with SIPs which over time will result in mold and rot. Therefore, constructing a house with SIPs must be done in dry weather. SIPs can also come under attached by vermin and insects just like a timber frame house.  SIPs manufacturers suggest applying an insecticide like boric acid to the panels which unfortunately will increase your CO2 footprint. SIPs also have a low thermal mass, unlike the brick, resulting in poor temperature regulation.

Conclusion. 

Choosing to build a house in Masonry, Timber-frame or SIPs will ultimately come down to several factors like budget, style, functionality and personal choice. You also have to consider environmental factors as some types of construction may not be suited to the geographical area or climate.

At Avant-Garde Construction, we love giving our clients a first class service and we are happy to explore the options with you, to ensure that you choose the best construction method for your build.

If you are serious about building a house, call us on 01323 351 763 for a free initial consultation

or apply for it through our website: https://www.ag-cg.co.uk/call-for-enquiry/

Contact us!

We are trustworthy construction company. Check out our reviews on Facebook.com: 

how long does a house last?

how long does a house last

The lifespan of a house should at least be longer than your average mortgage of 25-30 years, however, some build types last considerably longer than others.

So let’s have a look at the most popular options in the market today and see how they compare.   

1 . Brick and Block (Masonry) – Lifespan:  60- 100+ Years

The oldest and most traditional method of building is with the good old brick. The brick has been around since 7000 BC and has been used ever since for the construction of buildings. Brick and block constructions make for a very strong solid structure that will last many decades possibly even centuries if it is well maintained. 

Pros: Bricks are incredibly durable, and a well built and masonry house will last at least twice as long as a timber-frame equivalent. Bricks have a high thermal mass which means that they are very good at storing heat which in theory should help with maintaining an even temperature in your home throughout the day and night.

Cons: Brick and block is a slower building method compared to timber-frame and takes nearly twice as long as timberframe build. Materials for Masonry builds come with a higher cost but this type of build is one of the most durable ways to construct a house. 

According to a recent report, sluggish Government house building means that every house in existence in the UK will have to last for 2,000 years in order to keep up with demand – Check out the article here: https://www.constructionnews.co.uk/buildings/sectors/uk-houses-will-have-to-last-2000-years-says-lga-18-08-2017/

2. Timber Framed House – Lifespan: 25 – 30 Years

These days, your average timber-framed house is made from softwood timber, unlike our Tudor ancestors who built with solid hardwood Oak frames that have stood the test of time. Building with softwood timber is quick and relatively inexpensive compared to the more traditional methods of building like Brick and Block.

Pros: It is usually a much greener way of building compared to other building types as it produces much less CO2. Other positives include cost savings on labour and materials and better energy efficiency when it comes to heating the house because the heat doesn’t retain in the walls as much as a Masonry house.

Cons: Timber is vulnerable to wet and dry rot and from vermin and insect attacks. Termites that originate from Europe can now be found in several counties across the UK which can reap havoc in your timber-frame house. They are white ant-like insects that eat through timber 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Unfortunately, the majority of UK insurance companies do not cover wet/dry rot and any damage caused by vermin/insects. Temperature regulation is poor in a Timber framed house as it will have a low thermal mass. 

3. SIPS  – Lifespan:  60+ Years

A Structural Insulated Panel (SIP) is a piece of thick insulation bonded in-between two sheets of oriented strand board (OSB) and is a construction method that is now used for residential and light commercial construction projects. SIPs are a high-performance system that is extremely strong, energy-efficient and cost-effective. For these reasons building a house with SIPs, is a great investment.

Pros: The cost of building with SIPs is generally the same as building with timber due to reduced labour and material costs. SIPs constructions are very energy efficient with a low U-Value (heat loss indicator) and therefore require smaller heating/cooling systems. The lifespan of a SIPs house will last much longer than a timber-frame equivalent. SIPs panels are a great choice for Passive House projects. A Passive House is 90% more energy-efficient than a traditional house.   

Cons: Moisture problems can occur with SIPs which over time will result in mold and rot. Therefore, constructing a house with SIPs must be done in dry weather. SIPs can also come under attached by vermin and insects just like a timber frame house.  SIPs manufacturers suggest applying an insecticide like boric acid to the panels which unfortunately will increase your CO2 footprint. SIPs also have a low thermal mass, unlike the brick, resulting in poor temperature regulation.

Conclusion. 

Choosing to build a house in Masonry, Timber-frame or SIPs will ultimately come down to several factors like budget, style, functionality and personal choice. You also have to consider environmental factors as some types of construction may not be suited to the geographical area or climate.

At Avant-Garde Construction, we love giving our clients a first class service and we are happy to explore the options with you, to ensure that you choose the best construction method for your build.

If you are serious about building a house, call us on 01323 351 763 for a free initial consultation

or apply for it through our website: https://www.ag-cg.co.uk/call-for-enquiry/

Contact us!

We are trustworthy construction company. Check out our reviews on Facebook.com: 

how long does a house last?